Alloy Wheels Fitment Guide

Find your alloy wheels and tyres by vehicle make and model

Select your vehicle make from the list below, then select your model, then select the size of alloy wheels and tyres you require. This simple and quick process will guide you to finding fully suitable alloy wheels and tyres for your vehicle.

Fitment Guide

  • Do not use household or other detergents to clean your wheels, i.e. washing up liquid.
  • Rinse off any cleaning solutions before moving onto the next wheel.
  • Clean with a soft, un-abrasive cloth.
  • Do not use steam cleaners this can lead to surface peeling.
  • Do not use aluminium wheel polish on chrome, painted, or clear coated wheels.
  • Do not use tire cleaners.
  • Clean wheels only when they are cold.
  • Waxing your wheels can help protect the surface and help make future cleaning easier.
  • Only use cleaners specific to your wheel type. Never use acid based cleaners on any wheel.
  • We advise removing chrome wheels in winter and storing in a dry place. Not your garage.
Taking care of your wheels

Wheels are available with varying bolt patterns, and some have more than one bolt pattern allowing them to be fitted to a wider range of vehicles.

4 x 100

The number 4 refers to the number of holes in the wheel. The number 100 refers to the diameter of the circle of boltholes measured in millimetres.

Wheels with 4 or 6 boltholes are measured from the centre of one bolthole to the centre of the bolthole directly opposite. Wheels with 5 boltholes require special tools for accurate measurement.

We offer wheels with a wide variety of bolt patterns

Rim width is the measurement between the outside lip and inside lip of an alloy wheel. Rim width is measured in inches.

Rim width is usually displayed as 8J for example. This means that the rim width is 8 inches wide.

Every vehicle has a compatible rim width range (not a fixed width). For example: Audi A3 2002 has an offset range between 6J and 8.5J, as long as the rim width is within that range, the alloy wheels will be fully compatible.

When purchasing through wheelbasealloys.com, we ensure that the correct rim width alloy wheels are fitment checked for your vehicle. All you need to do is use our easy to use vehicle selector.

Guide to alloy wheel fitment

The wheel offset (measured in millimeters), can be negative or positive, and is the distance from the hub-mounting surface to the rim's true centerline.

The lower the offset is, the further out the alloy wheel will sit on the vehicle. The higher the offset is, then the further in the alloy wheel will sit on the vehicle.

Every vehicle has a compatible offset range (not a fixed offset). For example: Audi A3 2002 has an offset range between 30mm to 43mm, as long as the offset value is within that range, the alloy wheels will be fully compatible.

When purchasing through wheelbasealloys.com, we ensure that the correct offset alloy wheels are fitment checked for your vehicle. All you need to do is use our easy to use vehicle selector.

Our guide to alloy wheel offsets

This means your are increasing the size of your wheels and lowering the profile of your tyres for increased performance and style, here's the rule of thumb for Up-sizing, follow these simple rules for unchanged speedometer readings and fuel economy:

To increase wheel size by 1 inch

  • Increase the tyre section width by 10mm
  • Decrease the tyre aspect ratio by 10 points
  • Increase the wheel rim diameter by 1 inch

To increase wheel size by 2 inches

  • Increase the tyre section width by 20mm
  • Decrease the tyre aspect ratio by 20 points
  • Increase the wheel rim diameter by 2 inches
Our guide to up-sizing your wheels

Wheel PCD (Pitch Circle Diameter) is the notional circle determined by the position of the holes in an alloy wheel. The centre of every bolt lies on the circumference of the bolt circle.

PCD is measured in millimeters. Example: 4x100 mm (4 holes , 100 mm apart)

When purchasing from wheelbase we will ensure that you receive the correct PCD alloy wheels for your vehicle.

If you have any further questions about PCD (Pitch Circle Diameter), please do not hesitate to contact us.

Our guide to alloy wheels PCD

The centerbore of a wheel is the size of the hole in the back of the wheel that centers it over the mounting hub of the car. The wheel centerbore is measured in millimeters.

Many OEM factory fitted wheels are cast as hubcentric alloy wheels, which means that the centerbore is the exact same size as the wheel hub.

Many aftermarket alloy wheels have a larger centerbore which require spigot rings to be fitted. These spigot rings slot inside the wheel to make the correct centerbore for the vehicle they are being fitted on. Once fitted, the spigot rings provide a tight fit to the hub and are just as safe and secure as hubcentric alloy wheels. The advantage of the spigot ring system is that the wheels fit a wider range of vehicles, keeping the costs down, and also making them much more easily transferable.

All alloy wheels sold on wheelbasealloys.com are either hubcentric or supplied with the correct sized spigot rings.

Our guide to alloy wheel centre bore

Wheel bolts and nuts should always be tightened in the correct sequence. The correct tightening sequence for four, five, six and eight bolt wheels are shown here.

Always use a torque wrench when tightening wheel bolts check your car manual for the correct settings. When fitting new wheels re-torque the wheel bolts after about 60 to 90 miles.

Our guide to correct wheel bolt tightening sequences

Wheels are manufactured in various ways, most alloys are made in one, two or three pieces.

A one-piece wheel is made in a single mould. Two-piece wheels are made in two separate moulds and then the two pieces are welded or bolted together. Three-piece wheels are made in three separate moulds and then the three pieces are fixed together using very high quality bolts.

Our guide to how alloy wheels are made

Wheel alignment is crucial if your wheels are misaligned on either the front or rear this will permanently damage your tyres it causes them to wear unevenly it can also lead to suspension damage and poor handling.

If your wheels are misaligned you may feel the car pull to one side when you relax your grip on the steering wheel, you may also notice tread wear irregularities.

It is recommended that you have all four wheels aligned, however as some vehicles do not have any adjustment on the rear wheels this will not always be possible for best results always consult a professional.

Have your wheel alignment checked regularly, especially if your vehicle has come into contact with a kerb or other obstacle.

Our guide to wheel alignment

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